Insulation Upgrade

 Closed Cell spray foam insulation

Closed Cell spray foam insulation

Many homeowners like to add outwardly nice amenities to their homes. Marble tile, expensive high end appliances, and elegant trim are a few examples. Those are all visually great but one of the unseen and less overlooked upgrades to a new home is insulation. Spending a little more on the better insulation products can pay off well in the long run.

The homeowners opted for closed cell foam insulation. It costs a couple dollars more per square foot but the R value is almost twice what normal batted insulation affords. We insulated every exterior wall with closed cell spray foam insulation on this remodel. This type of insulation also has excellent properties for making a structure “air tight”. If installed properly it will close every air gap in the thermal envelope of the home. Air gaps are the biggest culprit for heating and cooling loss. As a bonus rodents and bugs are repelled by the closed cell insulation. They can’t eat it and they don’t like being around it.

In addition, the homeowners opted for a conditioned crawl space. This is a two step process. The first involves putting down a durable plastic barrier on the ground that is then sealed to the exterior foundation walls with closed cell spray foam.  This foam is sprayed all the way up to the box sill and the sub floor. Air returns and supplies from the HVAC system are placed in the crawl space to keep a constant temperature year-round. All of this creates a mold-free, pest free crawl space.

 Conditioned Crawl space   

Conditioned Crawl space

 

The Drawing Board

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We began this custom remodel in August of 2017. This home was built in 1977. As you can imagine home design has changed quite a bit since then. The most obvious change needed was in the roof pitch. We started with a 4/12  roof pitch. For curb appeal the first job was to figure out how to change the roof to a more modern 10/12 pitch. While that seems to be a simple process, it takes careful planning and execution. After many drawings by draftsmen, us, the homeowners and even the framers we settled on a plan. The first plan was to gable (see picture below) the porch and middle of the house on the existing 4/12 pitch.  After more consideration it was decided that changing the pitch to 10/12 was essential. In addition,  hipping the ends of the roof added more visual interest (bottom photo). After this was settled the new roof  was constructed over top of the old one. 

The front porch and entry way also needed to be updated. The existing front porch needed to be torn down to make room for a deeper, more dramatic entry.  The double gable over a new 8' front door completed the work for the new front entry.

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